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Hinsdale, Illinois |

Published Jan. 17, 2013                                      

God's grace a focus of Trinity Presbyterian

Community and mission work are also at the center of Hinsdale’s newest congregation


By Pamela Lannom
plannom@thehinsdalean.com 


   Tyra and John Bone moved to Hinsdale 15 years ago because of the great schools.
   When they decided to send their children to Timothy Christian School in Elmhurst, they wondered why they were here. They soon found another reason: Trinity Presbyterian Church.
   “We felt like maybe this was why God placed us in this community, to plant this church and meet other Christians in the area,” Tyra Bone said.
   The Bones were one of seven families that came together 11 years ago to pray about whether God was calling them to start a church. Obviously the answer was    “Yes!”, Tyra Bone pointed out with a laugh, and by 2004 the founders had hired a pastor and held the first official service at Hinsdale Middle School.
   And then, in May 2008, came what she calls “the hiccup.”
Trinity’s pastor was charged with one count of solicitation, a Class B misdemeanor, during a prostitution sting in St. Charles. At the time, many thought it meant the end of the church, which had just started holding services in The Community House.
   “It was an amazing time and an extremely hard time, especially for our family, because we were one of the founding families and we had hired him,” Tyra Bone said. “It was a shock to all of us.”
   But there were also lessons to be learned.
   “A church is not about a man, and God taught us that in amazing ways,” she said. “For a year without a pastor, we grew and people joined.”
   The church did have an ordained Presbyterian pastor, Ted Powers, as one of its founders. Powers was joined by pastors from neighboring Presbyterian Church of America congregations in keeping the pulpit full for more than a year, giving the church time to grieve before starting a search for a new pastor.
The time also helped members understand what it means to be a church, Skip Heidler said.
   “As a really young church, one of the foundations that Trinity was being built upon was that the community within the church was important,” he said. “I think that time really allowed us to see what that meant, because as a church we were having to really shoulder a lot more of what being a church meant without a pastor.”
   Geoff Ziegler, who joined the church about 3 1/2 years ago as its senior pastor, said how the church weathered the storm is part of what drew him to the position.

 

 

 

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